CFGADM_SBD(1M) Maintenance Commands CFGADM_SBD(1M)


NAME


cfgadm_sbd - cfgadm commands for system board administration

SYNOPSIS


cfgadm -l [-a] [-o parsable] ap_id...


cfgadm -c function [-f] [-y | -n]
[-o unassign | nopoweroff] [-v] ap_id...


cfgadm -t [-v] ap_id...


cfgadm -x [-f] [-v] function ap_id...


DESCRIPTION


The cfgadm_sbd plugin provides dynamic reconfiguration functionality for
connecting, configuring, unconfiguring, and disconnecting class sbd
system boards. It also enables you to connect or disconnect a system
board from a running system without having to reboot the system.


The cfgadm command resides in /usr/sbin. See cfgadm(1M). The cfgadm_sbd
plugin resides /usr/platform/sun4u/lib/cfgadm.


Each board slot appears as a single attachment point in the device tree.
Each component appears as a dynamic attachment point. You can view the
type, state, and condition of each component, and the states and
condition of each board slot by using the -a option.


The cfgadm options perform differently depending on the platform.
Additionally, the form of the attachment points is different depending on
the platform. See the Platform Notes section for more information.

Component Conditions


The following are the names and descriptions of the component conditions:

failed
The component failed testing.


ok
The component is operational.


unknown
The component has not been tested.


Component States


The following is the name and description of the receptacle state for
components:

connected
The component is connected to the board slot.


The following are the names and descriptions of the occupant states for
components:

configured
The component is available for use by the Solaris
operating environment.


unconfigured
The component is not available for use by the Solaris
operating environment.


Board Conditions


The following are the names and descriptions of the board conditions.

failed
The board failed testing.


ok
The board is operational.


unknown
The board has not been tested.


unusable
The board slot is unusable.


Board States


Inserting a board changes the receptacle state from empty to
disconnected. Removing a board changes the receptacle state from
disconnected to empty.


Caution: Removing a board that is in the connected state or that is
powered on and in the disconnected state crashes the operating system and
can result in permanent damage to the system.


The following are the names and descriptions of the receptacle states for
boards:

connected
The board is powered on and connected to the system bus.
You can view the components on a board only after it is
in the connected state.


disconnected
The board is disconnected from the system bus. A board
can be in the disconnected state without being powered
off. However, a board must be powered off and in the
disconnected state before you remove it from the slot.


empty
A board is not present.


The occupant state of a disconnected board is always unconfigured. The
following table contains the names and descriptions of the occupant
states for boards:

configured
At least one component on the board is configured.


unconfigured
All of the components on the board are unconfigured.


Dynamic System Domains


Platforms based on dynamic system domains (DSDs, referred to as domains
in this document) divide the slots in the chassis into electrically
isolated hardware partitions (that is, DSDs). Platforms that are not
based on DSDs assign all slots to the system permanently.


A slot can be empty or populated, and it can be assigned or available to
any number of domains. The number of slots available to a given domain is
controlled by an available component list (ACL) that is maintained on the
system controller. The ACL is not the access control list provided by the
Solaris operating environment.


A slot is visible to a domain only if the slot is in the domain's ACL and
if it is not assigned to another domain. An unassigned slot is visible to
all domains that have the slot in their ACL. After a slot has been
assigned to a domain, the slot is no longer visible to any other domain.


A slot that is visible to a domain, but not assigned, must first be
assigned to the domain before any other state changing commands are
applied. The assign can be done explicitly using -x assign or implicitly
as part of a connect. A slot must be unassigned from a domain before it
can be used by another domain. The unassign is always explicit, either
directly using -x unassign or as an option to disconnect using -o
unassign.

State Change Functions


Functions that change the state of a board slot or a component on the
board can be issued concurrently against any attachment point. Only one
state changing operation is permitted at a given time. A Y in the Busy
field in the state changing information indicates an operation is in
progress.


The following list contains the functions that change the state:

o configure

o unconfigure

o connect

o disconnect

Availability Change Functions


Commands that change the availability of a board can be issued
concurrently against any attachment point. Only one availability change
operation is permitted at a given time. These functions also change the
information string in the cfgadm -l output. A Y in the Busy field
indicates that an operation is in progress.


The following list contains the functions that change the availability:

o assign

o unassign

Condition Change Functions


Functions that change the condition of a board slot or a component on the
board can be issued concurrently against any attachment point. Only one
condition change operation is permitted at a given time. These functions
also change the information string in the cfgadm -l output. A Y in the
Busy field indicates an operation is in progress.


The following list contains the functions that change the condition:

o poweron

o poweroff

o test

Unconfigure Process


This section contains a description of the unconfigure process, and
illustrates the states of source and target boards at different stages
during the process of moving permanent memory.


In the following code examples, the permanent memory on board 0 must be
moved to another board in the domain. Thus, board 0 is the source, and
board 1 is the target.


A status change operation cannot be initiated on a board while it is
marked as busy. For brevity, the CPU information has been removed from
the code examples.


The process is started with the following command:

# cfgadm -c unconfigure -y SB0::memory &


First, the memory on board 1 in the same address range as the permanent
memory on board 0 must be deleted. During this phase, the source board,
the target board, and the memory attachment points are marked as busy.
You can display the status with the following command:

# cfgadm -a -s cols=ap_id:type:r_state:o_state:busy SB0 SB1

Ap_Id Type Receptacle Occupant Busy
SB0 CPU connected configured y
SB0::memory memory connected configured y
SB1 CPU connected configured y
SB1::memory memory connected configured y


After the memory has been deleted on board 1, it is marked as
unconfigured. The memory on board 0 remains configured, but it is still
marked as busy, as in the following example.

Ap_Id Type Receptacle Occupant Busy
SB0 CPU connected configured y
SB0::memory memory connected configured y
SB1 CPU connected configured y
SB1::memory memory connected unconfigured n


The memory from board 0 is then copied to board 1. After it has been
copied, the occupant state for the memory is switched. The memory on
board 0 becomes unconfigured, and the memory on board 1 becomes
configured. At this point in the process, only board 0 remains busy, as
in the following example.

Ap_Id Type Receptacle Occupant Busy
SB0 CPU connected configured y
SB0::memory memory connected unconfigured n
SB1 CPU connected configured n
SB1::memory memory connected configured n


After the entire process has been completed, the memory on board 0
remains unconfigured, and the attachment points are not busy, as in the
following example.

Ap_Id Type Receptacle Occupant Busy
SB0 CPU connected configured n
SB0::memory memory connected unconfigured n
SB1 CPU connected configured n
SB1::memory memory connected configured n


The permanent memory has been moved, and the memory on board 0 has been
unconfigured. At this point, you can initiate a new state changing
operation on either board.

Platform-Specific Options
You can specify platform-specific options that follow the options
interpreted by the system board plugin. All platform-specific options
must be preceded by the platform keyword. The following example contains
the general format of a command with platform-specific options:


command -o sbd_options,platform=platform_options

OPTIONS


This man page does not include the -v, -a, -s, or -h options for the
cfgadm command. See cfgadm(1M) for descriptions of those options. The
following options are supported by the cfgadm_sbd plugin:

-c function
Performs a state change function. You can use the
following functions:

unconfigure
Changes the occupant state to unconfigured.
This function applies to system board slots
and to all of the components on the system
board.

The unconfigure function removes the CPUs
from the CPU list and deletes the physical
memory from the system memory pool. If any
device is still in use, the cfgadm command
fails and reports the failure to the user.
You can retry the command as soon as the
device is no longer busy. If a CPU is in
use, you must ensure that it is off line
before you proceed. See pbind(1M),
psradm(1M) and psrinfo(1M).

The unconfigure function moves the physical
memory to another system board before it
deletes the memory from the board you want
to unconfigure. Depending of the type of
memory being moved, the command fails if it
cannot find enough memory on another board
or if it cannot find an appropriate
physical memory range.

For permanent memory, the operating system
must be suspended (that is, quiesced) while
the memory is moved and the memory
controllers are reprogrammed. If the
operating system must be suspended, you
will be prompted to proceed with the
operation. You can use the -y or -n options
to always answer yes or no respectively.

Moving memory can take several minutes to
complete, depending on the amount of memory
and the system load. You can monitor the
progress of the operation by issuing a
status command against the memory
attachment point. You can also interrupt
the memory operation by stopping the cfgadm
command. The deleted memory is returned to
the system memory pool.


disconnect
Changes the receptacle state to
disconnected. This function applies only to
system board slots.

If the occupant state is configured, the
disconnect function attempts to unconfigure
the occupant. It then powers off the system
board. At this point, the board can be
removed from the slot.

This function leaves the board in the
assigned state on platforms that support
dynamic system domains.

If you specify -o nopoweroff, the
disconnect function leaves the board
powered on. If you specify -o unassign, the
disconnect function unassigns the board
from the domain.

If you unassign a board from a domain, you
can assign it to another domain. However,
if it is assigned to another domain, it is
not available to the domain from which is
was unassigned.


configure
Changes the occupant state to configured.
This function applies to system board slots
and to any components on the system board.

If the receptacle state is disconnected,
the configure function attempts to connect
the receptacle. It then walks the tree of
devices that is created by the connect
function, and attaches the devices if
necessary. Running this function configures
all of the components on the board, except
those that have already been configured.

For CPUs, the configure function adds the
CPUs to the CPU list. For memory, the
configure function ensures that the memory
is initialized then adds the memory to the
system memory pool. The CPUs and the memory
are ready for use after the configure
function has been completed successfully.

For I/O devices, you must use the mount and
the ifconfig commands before the devices
can be used. See ifconfig(1M) and
mount(1M).


connect
Changes the receptacle state to connected.
This function applies only to system board
slots.

If the board slot is not assigned to the
domain, the connect function attempts to
assign the slot to the domain. Next, it
powers on and tests the board, then it
connects the board electronically to the
system bus and probes the components.

After the connect function is completed
successfully, you can use the -a option to
view the status of the components on the
board. The connect function leaves all of
the components in the unconfigured state.

The assignment step applies only to
platforms that support dynamic system
domains.


-f
Overrides software state changing constraints.

The -f option never overrides fundamental safety and
availability constraints of the hardware and operating
system.


-l
Lists the state and condition of attachment points
specified in the format controlled by the -s, -v, and -a
options as specified in cfgadm(1M). The cfgadm_sbd plugin
provides specific information in the info field as
described below. The format of this information might be
altered by the -o parsable option.

The parsable info field is composed of the following:

cpu
The cpu type displays the following information:

cpuid=#[,#...]
Where # is a number, and
represents the ID of the
CPU. If more than one #
is present, this CPU has
multiple active virtual
processors.


speed=#
Where # is a number and
represents the speed of
the CPU in MHz.


ecache=#
Where # is a number and
represents the size of
the ecache in MBytes. If
the CPU has multiple
active virtual
processors, the ecache
could either be shared
among the virtual
processors, or divided
between them.


memory
The memory type displays the following
information, as appropriate:

address=#
Where # is a number,
representing the base
physical address.


size=#
Where # is a number,
representing the size
of the memory in
KBytes.


permanent=#
Where # is a number,
representing the size
of permanent memory in
KBytes.


unconfigurable
An operating system
setting that prevents
the memory from being
unconfigured.


inter-board-interleave
The board is
participating in
interleaving with
other boards.


source=ap_id
Represents the source
attachment point.


target=ap_id
Represents the target
attachment point.


deleted=#
Where # is a number,
representing the
amount of memory that
has already been
deleted in KBytes.


remaining=#
Where # is a number,
representing the
amount of memory to be
deleted in KBytes.


io
The io type displays the following information:

device=path
Represents the physical path to
the I/O component.


referenced
The I/O component is referenced.


board
The board type displays the following boolean
names. If they are not present, then the
opposite applies.

assigned
The board is assigned to the
domain.


powered-on
The board is powered on.

The same items appear in the info field in a
more readable format if the -o parsable option
is not specified.


-o parsable
Returns the information in the info field as a boolean
name or a set of name=value pairs, separated by a space
character.

The -o parsable option can be used in conjunction with the
-s option. See the cfgadm(1M) man page for more
information about the -s option.


-t
Tests the board.

Before a board can be connected, it must pass the
appropriate level of testing.

Use of this option always attempts to test the board, even
if it has already passed the appropriate level of testing.
Testing is also performed when a -c connect state change
function is issued, in which case the test step can be
skipped if the board already shows an appropriate level of
testing. Thus the -t option can be used to explicitly
request that the board be tested.


-x function
Performs an sbd-class function. You can use the following
functions:

assign
Assigns a board to a domain.

The receptacle state must be disconnected or
empty. The board must also be listed in the
domain available component list. See Dynamic
System Domains.


unassign
Unassigns a board from a domain.

The receptacle state must be disconnected or
empty. The board must also be listed in the
domain available component list. See Dynamic
System Domains.


poweron
Powers the system board on.

The receptacle state must be disconnected.


poweroff
Powers the system board off.

The receptacle state must be disconnected.


OPERANDS


The following operands are supported:

Receptacle ap_id
For the Sun Fire high-end systems such as the Sun
Fire 15K , the receptacle attachment point ID takes
the form SBX or IOX, where X equals the slot number.

The exact format depends on the platform and
typically corresponds to the physical labelling on
the machine. See the platform specific information in
the NOTES section.


Component ap_id
The component attachment point ID takes the form
component_typeX, where component_type equals one of
the component types described in "Component Types"
and X equals the component number. The component
number is a board-relative unit number.

The above convention does not apply to memory
compontents. Any DR action on a memory attachment
point affects all of the memory on the system board.


EXAMPLES


The following examples show user input and system output on a Sun Fire
15K system. User input, specifically references to attachment points and
system output might differ on other Sun Fire systems, such as the Sun
Fire midrange systems such as the 6800. Refer to the Platform Notes for
specific information about using the cfgadm_sbd plugin on non-Sun Fire
high-end models.

Example 1: Listing All of the System Board



# cfgadm -a -s "select=class(sbd)"

Ap_Id Type Receptacle Occupant Condition
SB0 CPU connected configured ok
SB0::cpu0 cpu connected configured ok
SB0::memory memory connected configured ok
IO1 HPCI connected configured ok
IO1::pci0 io connected configured ok
IO1::pci1 io connected configured ok
SB2 CPU disconnected unconfigured failed
SB3 CPU disconnected unconfigured unusable
SB4 unknown empty unconfigured unknown


This example demonstrates the mapping of the following conditions:


o The board in Slot 2 failed testing.

o Slot 3 is unusable; thus, you cannot hot plug a board into
that slot.

Example 2: Listing All of the CPUs on the System Board



# cfgadm -a -s "select=class(sbd):type(cpu)"

Ap_Id Type Receptacle Occupant Condition
SB0::cpu0 cpu connected configured ok
SB0::cpu1 cpu connected configured ok
SB0::cpu2 cpu connected configured ok
SB0::cpu3 cpu connected configured ok


Example 3: Displaying the CPU Information Field



# cfgadm -l -s noheadings,cols=info SB0::cpu0

cpuid 16, speed 400 MHz, ecache 8 Mbytes


Example 4: Displaying the CPU Information Field in Parsable Format



# cfgadm -l -s noheadings,cols=info -o parsable SB0::cpu0

cpuid=16 speed=400 ecache=8


Example 5: Displaying the Devices on an I/O Board



# cfgadm -a -s noheadings,cols=ap_id:info -o parsable IO1

IO1 powered-on assigned
IO1::pci0 device=/devices/saf@0/pci@0,2000 referenced
IO1::pci1 device=/devices/saf@0/pci@1,2000 referenced


Example 6: Monitoring an Unconfigure Operation




In the following example, the memory sizes are displayed in Kbytes.


# cfgadm -c unconfigure -y SB0::memory &
# cfgadm -l -s noheadings,cols=info -o parsable SB0::memory SB1::memory

address=0x0 size=2097152 permanent=752592 target=SB1::memory
deleted=1273680 remaining=823472
address=0x1000000 size=2097152 source=SB0::memory


Example 7: Assigning a Slot to a Domain



# cfgadm -x assign SB2


Example 8: Unassigning a Slot from a Domain



# cfgadm -x unassign SB3


ATTRIBUTES


See attributes(5) for a description of the following attribute:


+---------------+-----------------+
|ATTRIBUTE TYPE | ATTRIBUTE VALUE |
+---------------+-----------------+
|Stability | See below. |
+---------------+-----------------+


The interface stability is evolving. The output stability is unstable.

SEE ALSO


cfgadm(1M), devfsadm(1M), ifconfig(1M), mount(1M), pbind(1M), psradm(1M),
psrinfo(1M), config_admin(3CFGADM), attributes(5)

NOTES


This section contains information on how to monitor the progress of a
memory delete operation. It also contains platform specific information.

Memory Delete Monitoring


The following shell script can be used to monitor the progress of a
memory delete operation.

# cfgadm -c unconfigure -y SB0::memory &
# watch_memdel SB0

#!/bin/sh
# This is the watch_memdel script.

if [ -z "$1" ]; then
printf "usage: %s board_id\n" `basename $0`
exit 1
fi

board_id=$1

cfgadm_info='cfgadm -s noheadings,cols=info -o parsable'

eval `$cfgadm_info $board_id::memory`

if [ -z "$remaining" ]; then
echo no memory delete in progress involving $board_id
exit 0
fi

echo deleting target $target

while true
do
eval `$cfgadm_info $board_id::memory`

if [ -n "$remaining" -a "$remaining" -ne 0 ]
then
echo $deleted KBytes deleted, $remaining KBytes remaining
remaining=
else
echo memory delete is done
exit 0
fi
sleep 1
done
exit 0


Sun Enterprise 10000 Platform Notes
The following syntax is used to refer to Platform Notes attachment points
on the Sun Enterprise 10000 system:

board::component


where board refers to the system board; and component refers to the
individual component. System boards can range from SB0 (zero) to SB15. A
maximum of sixteen system boards are available.


The DR 3.0 model running on a Sun Enterprise 10000 domain supports a
limited subset of the functionality provided by the cfgadm_sbd plugin.
The only supported operation is to view the status of attachment points
in the domain. This corresponds to the -l option and all of its
associated options.


Attempting to perform any other operation from the domain will result in
an error that states that the operation is not supported. All operations
to add or remove a system board must be initiated from the System Service
Processor.

Sun Fire High-End System Platform Notes
The following syntax is used to refer to attachment points on the Sun
Fire high-end systems:

board::component


where board refers to the system board or I/O board; and component refers
to the individual component.


Depending on the system's configuration, system boards can range from SB0
(zero) through SB17, and I/O boards can range from IO0 (IO zero) through
IO17. (A maximum of eighteen system and I/O boards are available).


The -t and -x options behave differently on the Sun Fire high-end system
platforms. The following list describes their behavior:

-t
The system controller uses a CPU to test system
boards by running LPOST, sequenced by the hpost
command. To test I/O boards, the driver starts
the testing in response to the -t option, and the
test runs automatically without user
intervention. The driver unconfigures a CPU and a
stretch of contiguous physical memory. Then, it
sends a command to the system controller to test
the board. The system controller uses the CPU and
memory to test the I/O board from inside of a
transaction/error cage. You can only use CPUs
from system boards (not MCPU boards) to test I/O
boards.


-x assign | unassign
In the Sun Fire high-end system administration
model, the platform administrator controls the
platform hardware through the use of an available
component list for each domain. This information
is maintained on the system controller. Only the
platform administrator can modify the available
component list for a domain.

The domain administrator is only allowed to
assign or unassign a board if it is in the
available component list for that domain. The
platform administrator does not have this
restriction, and can assign or unassign a board
even if it is not in the available component list
for a domain.


Sun Fire 15K Component Types
The following are the names and descriptions of the component types:

cpu
CPU


io
I/O device


memory
Memory


Note: An operation on a memory component affects all of the memory
components on the board.

Sun Fire Midrange Systems Platform Notes


References to attachment points are slightly different on Sun Fire
midrange servers such as the 6800, 4810, 4800, and 3800 systems than on
the Sun Fire high-end systems. The following syntax is used to refer to
attachment points on Sun Fire systems other than the Sun Fire 15K:

N#.board::component


where N# refers to the node; board refers to the system board or I/O
board; and component refers to the individual component.


Depending on the system's configuration, system boards can range from SB0
through SB5, and I/O boards can range from IB6 through IB9. (A maximum
of six system and four I/O boards are available).

Sun Fire Midrange System Component Types


The following are the names and descriptions of the component types:

cpu
CPU


pci
I/O device


memory
Memory


Note: An operation on a memory component affects all of the memory
components on the board.


October 13, 2003 CFGADM_SBD(1M)