CFGADM(1M) Maintenance Commands CFGADM(1M)


NAME


cfgadm - configuration administration

SYNOPSIS


/usr/sbin/cfgadm [-f] [-y | -n] [-v] [-o hardware_options]
-c function ap_id...


/usr/sbin/cfgadm [-f] [-y | -n] [-v] [-o hardware_options]
-x hardware_function ap_id...


/usr/sbin/cfgadm [-v] [-a] [-s listing_options]
[-o hardware_options] [-l [ap_id | ap_type]]


/usr/sbin/cfgadm [-v] [-o hardware_options] -t ap_id...


/usr/sbin/cfgadm [-v] [-o hardware_options] -h
[ap_id | ap_type]


DESCRIPTION


The cfgadm command provides configuration administration operations on
dynamically reconfigurable hardware resources. These operations include
displaying status, (-l), initiating testing, (-t), invoking configuration
state changes, (-c), invoking hardware specific functions, (-x), and
obtaining configuration administration help messages (-h). Configuration
administration is performed at attachment points, which are places where
system software supports dynamic reconfiguration of hardware resources
during continued operation of Solaris.


Configuration administration makes a distinction between hardware
resources that are physically present in the machine and hardware
resources that are configured and visible to Solaris. The nature of
configuration administration functions are hardware specific, and are
performed by calling hardware specific libraries.


Configuration administration operates on an attachment point. Hardware
resources located at attachment points can or can not be physically
replaceable during system operation, but are dynamically reconfigurable
by way of the configuration administration interfaces.


An attachment point defines two unique elements, which are distinct from
the hardware resources that exist beyond the attachment point. The two
elements of an attachment point are a receptacle and an occupant.
Physical insertion or removal of hardware resources occurs at attachment
points and results in a receptacle gaining or losing an occupant.
Configuration administration supports the physical insertion and removal
operations as well as other configuration administration functions at an
attachment point.


Attachment points have associated state and condition information. The
configuration administration interfaces provide control for transitioning
attachment point states. A receptacle can exist in one of three states:
empty, disconnected or connected, while an occupant can exist in one of
two states: configured or unconfigured.


A receptacle can provide the empty state, which is the normal state of a
receptacle when the attachment point has no occupants. A receptacle can
also provide the disconnected state if it has the capability of isolating
its occupants from normal system access. Typically this state is used for
various hardware specific testing prior to bringing the occupant's
resources into full use by the system, or as a step in preparing an
occupant for physical removal or reconfiguration. A receptacle in the
disconnected state isolates its occupant from the system as much as its
hardware allows, but can provide access for testing and setup. A
receptacle must provide the connected state, which allows normal access
to hardware resources contained on any occupants. The connected state is
the normal state of a receptacle that contains an occupant and that is
not currently undergoing configuration administration operations.


The hardware resources contained on an occupant in the unconfigured state
are not represented by normal Solaris data structures and are thus not
available for use by Solaris. Operations allowed on an unconfigured
occupant are limited to configuration administration operations. The
hardware resources of an occupant in the configured state are represented
by normal Solaris data structures and thus some or all of those hardware
resources can be in use by Solaris. All occupants provide both the
configured and unconfigured states,


An attachment point can be in one of five conditions: unknown, ok,
failing, failed, or unusable. An attachment point can enter the system in
any condition depending upon results of power-on tests and non-volatile
record keeping.


An attachment point with an occupant in the configured state is in one of
four conditions: unknown, ok, failing, or failed. If the condition is not
failing or failed an attachment point can change to failing during the
course of operation if a hardware dependent recoverable error threshold
is exceeded. If the condition is not failed an attachment point can
change to failed during operation as a result of an unrecoverable error.


An attachment point with an occupant in the unconfigured state can be in
any of the defined conditions. The condition of an attachment point with
an unconfigured occupant can decay from ok to unknown after a machine
dependent time threshold. Initiating a test function changes the
attachment point's condition to ok, failing or failed depending on the
outcome of the test. An attachment point that does not provide a test
function can leave the attachment point in the unknown condition. If a
test is interrupted, the attachment point's condition can be set to the
previous condition, unknown or failed. An attachment point in the
unknown, ok, failing, or failed conditions can be re-tested.


An attachment point can exist in the unusable condition for a variety of
reasons, such as inadequate power or cooling for the receptacle, an
occupant that is unidentifiable, unsupported, incorrectly configured,
etc. An attachment point in the unusable condition can never be used by
the system. It typically remains in this condition until the physical
cause is remedied.


An attachment point also maintains busy information that indicates when a
state change is in progress or the condition is being reevaluated.


Attachment points are referred to using hardware specific identifiers
(ap_ids) that are related to the type and location of the attachment
points in the system device hierarchy. An ap_id can not be ambiguous, it
must identify a single attachment point. Two types of ap_id
specifications are supported: physical and logical. A physical ap_id
contains a fully specified pathname, while a logical ap_id contains a
shorthand notation that identifies an attachment point in a more user-
friendly way.


For example, an attachment point representing a system's backplane slot
number 7 could have a physical ap_id of
/devices/central/fhc/sysctrl:slot7 while the logical ap_id could be
system:slot7. Another example, the third receptacle on the second PCI I/O
bus on a system could have a logical ap_id of pci2:plug3.


Attachment points may also be created dynamically. A dynamic attachment
point is named relative to a base attachment point which is present in
the system. ap_ids for dynamic attachment points consist of a base
component followed by two colons (::) and a dynamic component. The base
component is the base attachment point ap_id. The dynamic component is
hardware specific and generated by the corresponding hardware specific
library.


For example, consider a base attachment point, which represents a SCSI
HBA, with the physical ap_id /devices/sbus@1f,0/SUNW,fas@e,8800000:scsi
and logical ap_id c0 . A disk attached to this SCSI HBA could be
represented by a dynamic attachment point with logical ap_id
c0::dsk/c0t0d0 where c0 is the base component and dsk/c0t0d0 is the
hardware specific dynamic component. Similarly the physical ap_id for
this dynamic attachment point would be:
/devices/sbus@1f,0/SUNW,fas@e,8800000:scsi::dsk/c0t0d0


An ap_type is a partial form of a logical ap_id that can be ambiguous and
not specify a particular attachment point. An ap_type is a substring of
the portion of the logical ap_id up to but not including the colon (:)
separator. For example, an ap_type of pci would show all attachment
points whose logical ap_ids begin with pci.


The use of ap_types is discouraged. The new select sub-option to the -s
option provides a more general and flexible mechanism for selecting
attachment points. See OPTIONS.


The cfgadm command interacts primarily with hardware dependent functions
contained in hardware specific libraries and thus its behavior is
hardware dependent.


For each configuration administration operation a service interruption
can be required. Should the completion of the function requested require
a noticeable service interruption to interactive users, a prompt is
output on the standard error output for confirmation on the standard
input before the function is started. Confirmation can be overridden
using the -y or -n options to always answer yes or no respectively.
Hardware specific options, such as test level, are supplied as sub-
options using the -o option.


Operations that change the state of the system configuration are audited
by the system log daemon syslogd(1M).


The arguments for this command conform to the getopt(3C) and
getsubopt(3C) syntax convention.

OPTIONS


The following options are supported:

-a

Specifies that the -l option must also list dynamic attachment
points.


-cfunction

Performs the state change function on the attachment point specified
by ap_id.

Specify function as insert, remove, disconnect, connect, configure or
unconfigure. These functions cause state transitions at the
attachment point by calling hardware specific library routines and
are defined in the following list.

insert
Performs operations that allows the user to manually
insert an occupant or to activate a hardware supplied
mechanism that performs the physical insertion.
insert can have hardware specific side effects that
temporarily suspend activity in portions of the
system. In such cases the hardware specific library
generates appropriate warning messages and informs the
user of any special considerations or procedures
unique to that hardware. Various hardware specific
errors can cause this function to fail and set the
receptacle condition to unusable.


remove
Performs operations that allow the user to manually
remove an occupant or to activate a hardware supplied
mechanism to perform the physical removal. remove can
have hardware specific side effects that temporarily
suspend activity in portions of the system. In such
cases the hardware specific library generates
appropriate warning messages and informs the user of
any special considerations or procedures unique to
that hardware. Various hardware specific errors can
cause this function to fail and set the receptacle
condition to unusable.


disconnect
Performs hardware specific operations to put a
receptacle in the disconnected state, which can
prevent an occupant from operating in a normal fashion
through the receptacle.


connect
Performs hardware specific operations to put the
receptacle in the connected state, which allows an
occupant to operate in a normal fashion through the
receptacle.


configure
Performs hardware specific operations that allow an
occupant's hardware resources to be usable by Solaris.
Occupants that are configured are part of the system
configuration and are available for manipulation by
Solaris device manipulation maintenance commands (eg:
psradm(1M), mount(1M), ifconfig(1M)).


unconfigure
Performs hardware specific operations that logically
remove an occupant's hardware resources from the
system. The occupant must currently be configured and
its hardware resources must not be in use by Solaris.

State transition functions can fail due to the condition of the
attachment point or other hardware dependent considerations. All
state change functions in the direction of adding resources, (insert,
connect and configure) are passed onto the hardware specific library
when the attachment point is in the ok or unknown condition. All
other conditions require the use of the force option to allow these
functions to be passed on to the hardware specific library.
Attachment point condition does not prevent a hardware specific
library being called for related to the removal (remove, disconnect
and unconfigure), of hardware resources from the system. Hardware
specific libraries can reject state change functions if the
attachment point is in the unknown condition.

The condition of an attachment point is not necessarily changed by
the state change functions, however errors during state change
operations can change the attachment point condition. An attempt to
override a condition and force a state change that would otherwise
fail can be made by specifying the force option (-f). Hardware
specific safety and integrity checks can prevent the force option
from having any effect.


-f

Forces the specified action to occur. Typically, this is a hardware
dependent override of a safety feature. Forcing a state change
operation can allow use of the hardware resources of occupant that is
not in the ok or unknown conditions, at the discretion of any
hardware dependent safety checks.


-h [ap_id | ap_type ... ]

Prints out the help message text. If ap_id or ap_type is specified,
the help routine of the hardware specific library for the attachment
point indicated by the argument is called.


-l [ap_id | ap_type ... ]

Lists the state and condition of attachment points specified.
Attachment points can be filtered by using the -s option and select
sub-option. Invoking cfgadm without one of the action options is
equivalent to -l without an argument. The format of the list display
is controlled by the -v and -s options. When the -a option is
specified attachment points are dynamically expanded.


-n

Suppress any interactive confirmation and assume that the answer is
no. If neither -n or -y is specified, interactive confirmation is
obtained through the standard error output and the standard input. If
either of these standard channels does not correspond to a terminal
(as determined by isatty(3C)) then the -n option is assumed.


-ohardware_options

Supplies hardware specific options to the main command option. The
format and content of the hardware option string is completely
hardware specific. The option string hardware_options conforms to the
getsubopt(3C) syntax convention.


-slisting_options

Supplies listing options to the list (-l) command. listing_options
conforms to the getsubopt(3C) syntax convention. The sub-options are
used to specify the attachment point selection criteria (
select=select_string), the type of matching desired
(match=match_type), order of listing (sort=field_spec), the data that
is displayed (cols=field_spec and cols2=field_spec), the column
delimiter (delim=string) and whether to suppress column headings
(noheadings).

When the select sub-option is specified, only attachment points which
match the specified criteria will be listed. The select sub-option
has the following syntax:

cfgadm -s select=attr1(value1):attr2(value2)...


where an attr is one of ap_id, class or type. ap_id refers to the
logical ap_id field, class refers to attachment point class and type
refers to the type field. value1, value2, etc. are the corresponding
values to be matched. The type of match can be specified by the match
sub-option as follows:

cfgadm -s match=match_type,select=attr1(value1)...


where match_type can be either exact or partial. The default value is
exact.

Arguments to the select sub-option can be quoted to protect them from
the shell.

A field_spec is one or more data-fields concatenated using colon (:),
as in data-field:data-field:data-field. A data-field is one of ap_id,
physid, r_state, o_state, condition, type, busy, status_time,
status_time_p, class, and info. The ap_id field output is the logical
name for the attachment point, while the physid field contains the
physical name. The r_state field can be empty, disconnected or
connected. The o_state field can be configured or unconfigured. The
busy field can be either y if the attachment point is busy, or n if
it is not. The type and info fields are hardware specific. The
status_time field provides the time at which either the r_state,
o_state, or condition of the attachment point last changed. The
status_time_p field is a parsable version of the status_time field.
If an attachment point has an associated class, the class field lists
the class name. If an attachment point does not have an associated
class, the class field lists none.

The order of the fields in field_spec is significant: For the sort
sub-option, the first field given is the primary sort key. For the
cols and cols2 sub-options, the fields are printed in the order
requested. The order of sorting on a data-field can be reversed by
placing a minus (-) before the data-field name within the field_sec
for the sort sub-option. The default value for sort is ap_id. The
defaults values for cols and cols2 depend on whether the -v option is
given: Without it cols is ap_id:r_state:o_state:condition and cols2
is not set. With -v cols is ap_id:r_state:o_state:condition:info and
cols2 is status_time:type:busy:physid:. The default value for delim
is a single space. The value of delim can be a string of arbitrary
length. The delimiter cannot include comma (,) character, see
getsubopt(3C). These listing options can be used to create parsable
output. See NOTES.


-t

Performs a test of one or more attachment points. The test function
is used to re-evaluate the condition of the attachment point. Without
a test level specifier in hardware_options, the fastest test that
identifies hard faults is used.

More comprehensive tests are hardware specific and are selected using
the hardware_options.

The results of the test is used to update the condition of the
specified occupant to either ok if no faults are found, failing if
recoverable faults are found or failed if any unrecoverable faults
are found.

If a test is interrupted, the attachment point's condition can be
restored to its previous value or set to unknown if no errors were
found or failing if only recoverable errors were found or to failed
if any unrecoverable errors were found. The attachment point should
only be set to ok upon normal completion of testing with no errors.


-v

Executes in verbose mode. For the -c, -t and -x options outputs a
message giving the results of each attempted operation. Outputs
detailed help information for the -h option. Outputs verbose
information for each attachment point for the -l option.


-xhardware_function

Performs hardware specific functions. Private hardware specific
functions can change the state of a receptacle or occupant.
Attachment point conditions can change as the result of errors
encountered during private hardware specific functions. The format
and content of the hardware_function string is completely hardware
specific. The option string hardware_function conforms to the
getsubopt(3C) syntax convention.


-y

Suppresses any interactive confirmation and assume that the answer is
yes.


USAGE


The required privileges to use this command are hardware dependent.
Typically, a default system configuration restricts all but the list
option to the superuser.

EXAMPLES


Example 1: Listing Attachment Points in the Device Tree




The following example lists all attachment points except dynamic
attachment points.


example# cfgadm

Ap_Id Type Receptacle Occupant Cond
system:slot0 cpu/mem connected configured ok
system:slot1 sbus-upa connected configured ok
system:slot2 cpu/mem connected configured ok
system:slot3 unknown connected unconfigured unknown
system:slot4 dual-sbus connected configured failing
system:slot5 cpu/mem connected configured ok
system:slot6 unknown disconnected unconfigured unusable
system:slot7 unknown empty unconfigured ok
c0 scsi-bus connected configured unknown
c1 scsi-bus connected configured unknown


Example 2: Listing All Configurable Hardware Information




The following example lists all current configurable hardware
information, including those represented by dynamic attachment points:


example# cfgadm -al

Ap_Id Type Receptacle Occupant Cond
system:slot0 cpu/mem connected configured ok
system:slot1 sbus-upa connected configured ok
system:slot2 cpu/mem connected configured ok
system:slot3 unknown connected unconfigured unknown
system:slot4 dual-sbus connected configured failing
system:slot5 cpu/mem connected configured ok
system:slot6 unknown disconnected unconfigured unusable
system:slot7 unknown empty unconfigured ok
c0 scsi-bus connected configured unknown
c0::dsk/c0t14d0 disk connected configured unknown
c0::dsk/c0t11d0 disk connected configured unknown
c0::dsk/c0t8d0 disk connected configured unknown
c0::rmt/0 tape connected configured unknown
c1 scsi-bus connected configured unknown


Example 3: Listing Selectively, Based on Attachment Point Attributes




The following example lists all attachment points whose class begins with
scsi, ap_id begins with c and type field begins with scsi. The argument
to the -s option is quoted to protect it from the shell.


example# cfgadm -s "match=partial,select=class(scsi):ap_id(c):type(scsi)"

Ap_Id Type Receptacle Occupant Cond
c0 scsi-bus connected configured unknown
c1 scsi-bus connected configured unknown


Example 4: Listing Current Configurable Hardware Information in Verbose


Mode


The following example lists current configurable hardware information for
ap-type system in verbose mode:


example# cfgadm -v -l system
Ap_Id Receptacle Occupant Condition Information
When Type Busy Phys_Id
system:slot1 connected configured ok
Apr 4 23:50 sbus-upa n /devices/central/fhc/sysctrl:slot1
system:slot3 connected configured ok non-detachable
Apr 17 11:20 cpu/mem n /devices/central/fhc/sysctrl:slot3
system:slot5 connected configured ok
Apr 4 23:50 cpu/mem n /devices/central/fhc/sysctrl:slot5
system:slot7 connected configured ok
Apr 4 23:50 dual-sbus n /devices/central/fhc/sysctrl:slot7


The When column represents the status_time field.

Example 5: Testing Two Occupants Using the Hardware Specific Extended Test




The following example tests two occupants using the hardware specific
extended test:


example# cfgadm -v -o extended -t system:slot3 system:slot5
Testing attachment point system:slot3 ... ok
Testing attachment point system:slot5 ... ok


Example 6: Configuring an Occupant Using the Force Option




The following example configures an occupant in the failing state to the
system using the force option:


example# cfgadm -f -c configure system:slot3


Example 7: Unconfiguring an Occupant From the System




The following example unconfigures an occupant from the system:


example# cfgadm -c unconfigure system:slot4


Example 8: Configuring an Occupant at an Attachment Point




The following example configures an occupant:


example# cfgadm -c configure c0::dsk/c0t0d0


ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES


See environ(5) for descriptions of the following environment variables
that affect the execution of cfgadm: LC_TIME, LC_MESSAGES, NLSPATH and
TZ.

LC_MESSAGES
Determines how cfgadm displays column headings and error
messages. Listing output data is not affected by the
setting of this variable.


LC_TIME
Determines how cfgadm displays human readable status
changed time (status_time).


TZ
Specifies the timezone used when converting the status
changed time. This applies to both the human readable
(status_time) and parsable (status_time_p) formats.


EXIT STATUS


The following exit values are returned:

0
Successful completion.


1
An error occurred.


2
Configuration administration not supported on specified target.


3
Usage error.


SEE ALSO


cfgadm_fp(1M), cfgadm_ib(1M), cfgadm_pci(1M), cfgadm_sbd(1M),
cfgadm_scsi(1M), cfgadm_usb(1M), ifconfig(1M), mount(1M), prtdiag(1M),
psradm(1M), syslogd(1M), config_admin(3CFGADM), getopt(3C),
getsubopt(3C), isatty(3C), attributes(5), environ(5)

DIAGNOSTICS


Diagnostic messages appear on the standard error output. Other than
options and usage errors, the following are diagnostic messages produced
by this utility:

cfgadm: Configuration administration not supported onap_id


cfgadm: No library found for ap_id


cfgadm: ap_idis ambiguous


cfgadm: operation: Insufficient privileges


cfgadm: Attachment point is busy, try again


cfgadm: No attachment points with specified attributes found


cfgadm: System is busy, try again


cfgadm: operation: Operation requires a service interruption


cfgadm: operation: Data error: error_text


cfgadm: operation: Hardware specific failure: error_text


See config_admin(3CFGADM) for additional details regarding error
messages.

NOTES


Hardware resources enter the unconfigured pool in a hardware specific
manner. This can occur at various times such as: system initialization
or as a result of an unconfigure operation. An occupant that is in the
unconfigured state is not available for use by the system until specific
intervention occurs. This intervention can be manifested as an operator
initiated command or it can be by way of an automatic configuring
mechanism.


The listing option of the cfgadm command can be used to provide parsable
input for another command, for example within a shell script. For
parsable output, the -s option must be used to select the fields
required. The -s option can also be used to suppress the column headings.
The following fields always produce parsable output: ap_id, physid,
r_state, o_state, condition, busy status_time_p, class, and type.
Parsable output never has white-space characters embedded in the field
value.


The following shell script fragment finds the first good unconfigured
occupant of type CPU.

found=
cfgadm -l -s "noheadings,cols=ap_id:r_state:condition:type" | \
while read ap_id r_state cond type
do
if [ "$r_state" = unconfigured -a "$cond" = ok -a "$type" = CPU ]
then
if [ -z "$found" ]
then
found=$ap_id
fi
fi
done
if [ -n "$found" ]
then
echo "Found CPU $found"
fi


The format of the parsable time field (status_time_p) is YYYYMMDDhhmmss,
giving the year, month, day, hour, minute and second in a form suitable
for string comparison.


Reference should be made to the hardware specific documentation for
details of System Configuration Administration support.


October 25, 2004 CFGADM(1M)